ENCANTO FARMS
"we be bananas" in San Diego



.
HOME
>
A-B
C-D
E-F
G-I
J-L
M-N
O-Q
R-S
T-Z

.

GIANT CAVENDISH

DESCRIPTION:
A Cavendish variety. In general, the Cavendish group is resistant to Panama disease, but is susceptible to Sigatoka. The characteristic that distinguishes the best known clones is the height of the pseudostem. The tallest clone is 'Lacatan' followed by 'Robusta' and 'Giant Cavendish,' 'Grand Nain,' and 'Dwarf Cavendish.' 'Valery,' a common type in Central America, is considered the same as 'Robusta' by some taxonomists. (028)

TYPE:
GENETICS: AAA (028) (025)
HEIGHT:
HIGHLIGHTS:





GIANT PISANG

DESCRIPTION:
If a compatible banana is flowering the fruit will be full of hard, indigestible seeds. This sturdy vigorous cultivar may grow 60 to 80 ft. in the jungle and has a beautiful pink flower. (056)

TYPE:
GENETICS:
HEIGHT: 20-30' (056)
HIGHLIGHTS:





GIANT PLANTAIN

DESCRIPTION:
A taller version of the "Puerto Rican DWARF PLANTAIN". Both produce a superior fruit and are commonly used for "maduros" and "tostones", a staple in the Caribbean and Hispanic cuisine. This is the one you find in the super market. (011) [I]s rather slender and not very wind tolerant but will grow well in protected areas The plant produces heads of long fruit with five to seven hands. The fruit are usually cooked rather than eaten fresh. (032) This giant produces extra-large bunches of long fruit. Each bunch contains five to seven large hands of bananas. This productive giant is grown commercially throughout the world. The fruit is excellent when cooked as a vegetable or fried. Plantains prefer full sun and rich, moist fertile soil. (039) The French Horn produces a larger bunch of fruit than even the Giant Plantain. (039)

TYPE: PLANTAIN, COOKING
GENETICS:
HEIGHT: 14-18' (032), 18' (011) (010) (039)
HIGHLIGHTS:





GLORIA

DESCRIPTION:
Other varieties grown in the [Philippines] include the Morado, Pitogo, Los Banos, Senorita, Tindok, Gloria, Granda, and Tumok. (066)

TYPE:
GENETICS:
HEIGHT:





GLUAY NAMWAH

DESCRIPTION:


TYPE:
GENETICS:
HEIGHT:

(910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910)



GOLDEN AROMATIC

DESCRIPTION:
A Cavendish type sweet banana that has a fragrant aroma and gold, ripe fruit. The full sized fruit produced from this wide leaved plant is a real taste treat. (011) (010) Strong pleasant fragrance. Medium sized bunches, large fruit sweet and creamy (063)

TYPE: DESSERT
GENETICS: AAA (009)
HEIGHT: 10-12' (011) (010)
HIGHLIGHTS:

(910)



GOLDEN BEAUTY

DESCRIPTION:
A man-made hybrid produced in 1928. The plant bears medium bunches of shorter (4 to 6-inch) golden-skinned bananas. (007) [E]specially bred at the Imperial College of Tropical Agriculture in Trinidad in 1928 by crossing the 'Gros Michel' with a wild Musa acuminata . It is resistant to Panama disease and very resistant to Sigatoka. Though the bunches are small and the fruits short, they ship and ripen well and this cultivar is grown for export in Honduras and has been planted in Hawaii, Samoa and Fiji. Enano Gigante' is the most widely grown cultivar in that region [(Mexico)] but the tests showed that 'Enano Nautia' and 'Golden Beauty' bore heavier bunches of better quality fruit, even though 'Enano Gigante' had a greater number of bunches and highest yield per ground area. (076) Man-made hybrid. (009)

TYPE:
GENETICS: AAAA (009) (025)
HEIGHT: 15-25'(000)
DISEASE: Panama resistant, Sigatoka resistant
HIGHLIGHTS:





GOLDEN PILLOW

DESCRIPTION:
A slender plant which will thrive in a sheltered location. Similar in appearance to Manzano but with more pink in the leaves. Fruit is small but very delicious. (061) Plump, thin-skinned and very sweet fruit. The plant is green with red at junction of leaf and pseudostem (063) A moderately vigorous plant similar in appearance to Manzano but more slender in all its parts and with more pink coloration in the leaf sheathes. The bunches take longer to appear and ripen and the fruit is smaller than the Manzano but the flavor and texture are somewhat better than that variety (007) A moderately vigorous plant. The bunches take longer to appear and ripen and the fruit is smaller than the Manzano but the flavor and texture are somewhat better. (047) 4"long, fat fruit in bunches 20-30 lbs. Excellent and superior to Manzano (052) '[H]as moderate wind tolerance. The fruit is short and fat with thin skin; it is nearly identical to its parent, the 'Apple' banana. [C]an be eaten before ripe without any acidity or apple flavor. The flesh is very sweet and is a favorite in SE Asia. It is also susceptible to disease. (056) A moderately vigorous plant. (096)

TYPE:
GENETICS:
HEIGHT: 10-12' (056), 12-16 (061) (007) (047), 14' (052)
HIGHLIGHTS:

(005) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (061)



GOLDFINGER
FHIA-1

DESCRIPTION:
A rapid growing, mostly green plant producing a wonderful tasting, slightly sub-acid, refreshing fruit that gets 6-8 inches long or better. It is a very disease resistant, wind & cool tolerant plant that is easy to grow. In our area the ripening fruit does not get dark yellow, instead gives only a slight color change when mature so check it often when close to harvesting. (011) (010) (013a) Excellent taste. Brand new variety developed at the FHIA (Fundación Hondureña de Investigacion Agrícola) Research Station in Honduras. Medium size plant with broad leaves and outstanding fruit production. Cold tolerant and disease resistant. May be the next grocery store variety. Developed to be commercial export banana. Very strong plant with stout base. Excellent taste. Will never disappoint. (030) A recent product of the banana breeding program in Honduras, this cultivar has commercial potential. It has a high wind resistance, some cold tolerance, and excellent disease resistance with s strong pseudostem and base. It is an outstanding producer of delicious tasting bananas that are reminiscent of one of its parents, Musa Dwarf Prata. (032) A rapid growing, mostly green plant producing a wonderful tasting, slightly sub-acid, refreshing fruit that gets 6-8 inches long or better. It is a very disease resistant plant. It is also very wind and cool tolerant that is easy to grow. (037) [T]he first new banana variety from a breeding programme to be adopted for commercial production. It has been released in Australia as "Goldfinger" where it is showing good potential for production in sub-tropical areas. This variety is resistant to Sigatoka and Fusarium diseases as well as to nematodes. It is cold tolerant and can therefore be grown in the sub-tropics with the minimal application of pesticides. It produces good yields of fruit with a sweet-acid flavour but the texture of the fruit at maturity is rather softer than Cavendish. (053) [D]eveloped in Honduras for disease resistance, demonstrates greater tolerance to drought, cold spells, and nematode attack than most varieties. It can support 100 lbs. of fruit without propping and produce a raceme in under a year. Fruit is slightly tart, and will not turn brown when diced. It is good eaten fresh or used in cooking. This hardy variety performs very well at ECHO and is extremely productive and easy to grow. It is not as sweet as most bananas, but it is very tasty. (056) Goldfinger-released in 1989 this banana was bred in Honduras specifically for the less favorable conditions of subtropical areas, so is definitley worth a try. (058) The first product of a banana improvement research project of Fundación Hondureña de Investigacion Agrícola, funded by the Honduran government. It has been replaced to some degree by later FHIA efforts. Overall this variety takes longer to mature than most others but also seems the most cold tolerant and has shown to be very resistant to choking in California. It is reported to be a very good cool-summer variety as well as the only variety cold hardy enough to produce commercial quality fruit (that means "good" in this case) from the frosty regions of South Africa. Bred from Dwarf Brazilian (AKA Santa Catarina Prata), this variety is resistant to Black Sigatoka, three strains of Panama Disease, and crown rot. It produces good crops even in soils of marginal quality or areas of lower humidity. It is notably more resistant to rot in cold, wet winter soils but still needs rich, well drained soils in order to survive. It is relatively wind resistant. It is best ripened on the plant (naturally, without extra ethylene), and has a somewhat acid, apple-like flavor usually rated as extremely good. Fruit which ripens over winter is well-flavored also, if you can site it so it keeps some foliage. It can be cooked, ripe or green, like a plantain, or simply eaten fresh. Generally a failure in tropical climates where it reportedly has a mediocre flavor, it has "not bad" flavor in warm subtropical climates and simply excellent flavor in cooler climates according to those who have tasted it, even better than that of tropical-origin, Cavendish-type fruits. Some of this discrepancy of quality of flavor between climates might be ascribed to the unfamiliarity of tropical inhabitants to fruits with much acidity, but it also might be that under warmer conditions its flavor becomes less distinctive. [O]f stout construction and with broad leaves, with fruit clusters in the 30-100 lb. range. (079) [H[hardy, semi-dwarf, apple-flavored dessert banana which is resistant to Panama disease, tolerant to Sigatoka leaf spots, and resistant to nematodes. Is being grown commercially in Australia. Adapted to a wide range of climates, including subtropical conditions and high altitudes. Also has a good flavor and texture as a boiled or fried (sliced) green cooking banana. The strong plant supports bunch weights of 100 lbs. without a need for propping. (092) This fruit is an alternative for local consumption (ripe or green) or exported to international organic products market. It's resistant to three strains of Panama Disease and to crown rot. These diseases have recently caused large losses in the export banana business. [A]lso resistant to Black Sigatoka, which makes it a high growth potential crop in the organic products market. Ethylene should not be used for ripening since the fruit's flavor is enhanced and the texture becomes firmer when naturally ripened. It produces strong plants of high yields in adverse conditions of poor rainfall and soil. It is able to withstand temperatures even lower than that of the Cavendish variety. When ripe, the fruit tastes like apples; and the fruit tastes good even when cooked or fried green slices. (095) A hardy new commercial variety that is a prolific grower (063) Very strong plant supporting 100 pound bunches. A hardy plant resistant to disease and cold tolerant. Excellent flavor, especially when fully ripe. (096) Prata Ana x SH3142 (038) Hybrid between Brazilian and Commercial. (052) Excellent tasting fruit, with a tart note that's almost citrusy. It's also a very sturdy, tall plant. (908)

HISTORY
The career of the agricultural researcher can at times be stimulating and rewarding, but years of dedication, effort and hope can also lead to failure if the research takes a wrong turn along the way. Franklin Rosales knows he is one of the fortunate ones among scientists. Rosales, a plant breeding specialist in Honduras, has dedicated 17 years to agricultural research, most recently in the area of genetically improved bananas. He shares a recent breakthrough with colleague Philip Rowe, both of whom are now known worldwide because they have been able to breed a banana that is nutritious, good tasting, environmentally friendly and disease-resistant. After decades of painstaking breeding, FHIA-01 or Goldfinger as the world will come to know it is the first banana variety ever bred that could replace the standard Cavendish banana. It may well save the world's banana export industry from collapse as diseases take an unsurmountable toll. More important yet, it could ensure reliable food supplies for the millions of people in Africa, Asia and Latin America for whom bananas and plantains are staple foods. Rosales, 46, comes from a large lower middle-class family that moved from southern Honduras to La Lima, near the northern city of San Pedro Sula, the country's second largest city, when he was a young boy. Shortly thereafter, in 1954, workers at the American-owned United Fruit Company today United Brands began an historic strike in La Lima that led to major changes in the labour laws of the country. Violence associated with the strike caused many families to leave the area, including the Rosales family, who moved into San Pedro Sula. Many years later, Franklin Rosales choice of profession would lead him back to La Lima and a research position with the Honduran Foundation for Agricultural Research (FHIA). Rosales career in agricultural science began almost by accident. As an adolescent, Rosales was inclined toward mathematics a skill he inherited from his father who taught math in school and planned to pursue engineering or architecture. But on a whim he decided to write the entrance exam to the Panamerican Agricultural School. A month later the school informed him that he had won a scholarship for agronomy studies. He graduated as an agricultural engineer in 1968. After further studies in Switzerland, Rosales worked for the Honduran Natural Resources Ministry as an agricultural extension officer. His work took him for two years to Puerto Cortes on the Atlantic coast. There, Rosales met his wife of 22 years, Pacita Williams. They have a son, 19, and two daughters aged 18 and 12. Rosales spent much of the 1970s studying in the United States, gaining Bachelor's and Master's degrees in agronomy from New Mexico State University and a doctorate in plant breeding from Oklahoma State University. His studies were followed by research postings in Honduras, Costa Rica and Jamaica. In 1986, Rosales signed on with the Honduran Foundation for Agricultural Research as a plant breeder in the banana and plantain improvement program. The program, supported by IDRC and other donors, continues an initiative begun by the United Fruit Company as early as 1959 to find new banana varieties resistant to diseases. Rosales American colleague, Dr. Philip Rowe, is the program coordinator. Rosales spends a few hours each day at his office at the FHIA (Fundación Hondureña de Investigacion Agrícola) headquarters in La Lima, but most of his work is done inspecting leaves in the banana groves nearby or at the Guarama Uno laboratories, monitoring the progress of new hybrids and implants.The development of the new Goldfinger banana was a lengthy process for Rosales and his colleagues, requiring years of patient, careful experimentation and observation. Although bananas and plantains are easily multiplied by replanting sprouts from mature plants, the biggest difficulty in breeding new varieties is that commercial varieties lack seeds. Therefore, breeders must rely on wild or other varieties that may be poor for eating but do produce viable pollen or seeds. The wild varieties may also have other desired qualities such as disease resistance that can be crossed with standard varieties having good eating qualities. FHIA (Fundación Hondureña de Investigacion Agrícola)'s program drew on a gene pool of over 800 cultivars collected in Southeast Asia, from where bananas originated. Pollinating the flowers is a difficult, painstaking process that requires workers to pollinate each flower by hand at first light of day before the sun dries out the pollen. When the bananas are harvested three months later, they are peeled by hand, mashed in a press developed by Dr Rowe, and passed through a sieve. This messy, laborious process eventually yields one or two seeds per bunch, about half of which are successfully germinated to produce young plants.During the years leading up to Goldfinger's development, thousands of hybrid plants were cultivated. Only a few survived the rigorous selection process that weeded out any plants susceptible to disease. The first big breakthrough came in 1977 with the development of a hybrid that had good bunch size and was resistant to burrowing nematodes - a widespread pest controlled by potent, expensive pesticides - and to Race 4 of Panama disease. The latter is a deadly soilborne fungus that wipes out crops and cannot be controlled by existing fungicides. Crossed with a female Brazilian apple-flavoured Dwarf Prata clone, the new hybrid showed good resistance to Black Sigatoka, a fungal leaf spot disease that can cut fruit production by half and causes premature ripening. This resistance to Black Sigatoka was an especially important feature, because the disease has spread through plantations around the world. It can be controlled only by environmentally damaging applications of fungicides. And the cost of the fungicides is a financial burden that has forced many small farmers to withdraw from production. Other qualities that made the Goldfinger banana stand out for the FHIA (Fundación Hondureña de Investigacion Agrícola) team are its productivity and suitablity for smallholder production in areas where traditional varieties do not grow. To top things off, Goldfinger has a flavour that is proving popular with consumers, it ships well, and the fruit ripens slowly. As rewarding as scientific research has been for Rosales, it is not the most important aspect of his life. "For me religion comes first, then my family and then my work", says Rosales. He and his wife travel every two weeks to the town of Santa Barbara in the western part of Honduras, where they visit a friend, Spanish priest Enrique Silvestre, who came to the country 25 years ago as a missionary. Over the past five years, Rosales has established a community agricultural program there aimed especially at women and children that has drawn praise from residents and visitors alike. "It is our way of contributing. We teach people in the villages how to grow food so they can help themselves survive, but at the same time we are helping Father Enrique in his mission." While he maintains his strong devotion to church and family, Rosales also continues his own scientific mission. Apart from Goldfinger, Rosales and his colleagues have developed two other promising banana hybrids and are pursuing new high-yielding, disease-resistant plantains. In the words of Rosales: "The work of the researcher never ends. We must go forward, what we have is not sufficient. We have to look for new and better varieties."(042) This fruit is an alternative for local consumption (ripe or green) or exported to international organic products market. It's resistant to three strains of Panama Disease and to crown rot. These diseases have recently caused large losses in the export banana business. [A]lso resistant to Black Sigatoka, which makes it a high growth potential crop in the organic products market. (095)

TYPE: DESSERT
GENETICS: AAAB (006) (064) (079)
HEIGHT: 7-10' (079), 9-10' (910), 10-12' (011) (013a) (037), 12' (048), 12-14' (030), 14' (032), 15'(908)
DISEASE: Black sigatoka resistant, Panana resistant (3 strains), Crown rot resistant. (126)
HIGHLIGHTS: Good "beginner" banana: reliable, problem free.

(910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (038) (022) (010) (044) (044) (101) (105) (095) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (032) (037) (045) (000)



GRAN NAIN
Grand Naine, Grande Naine, Chiquita, Umalog (022), Musa Nana (013a) ,

DESCRIPTION:
The commercial variety that you can buy in the grocery store. The purchased ones are good but when you grow it yourself and see how delicious this banana can taste you wonder what took you so long to try. These full sized fruit ripen rapidly, so be ready. They can give 40-60 pounds of fruit with ease. (011) (013a) Commercially this banana tree is the highest yielding of all others. Sometimes two full stalks of bananas often will appear on a single plant. (999) The length of the fruit is about 12 inches long if the weather conditions are right. This banana tree, like most others, likes thick mulches and leaf mold or any other decomposed organic matter. (003) A wonderful banana producing 50 to 75 lbs. of "Chiquita" (Central American type) bananas. Highly attractive for its landscape and wind resistance. (061) The Dwarf Cavendish cultivar that is supplanting all others for imported commercial production, plant produces large bunches of the typical Chiquita banana. Shorter than Enano Gigante. (007) Currently the most important commercial clone in the world. It is vigorous, productive (bunches of fruit weighing over 100 lbs.). Sturdy and semi-hardy. (009) Produces large stocks of 100-150 pounds of bananas. A big commercial variety in Central America, very stout and attractive (063) [B]elongs to a subgroup of cultivated bananas called the 'Cavendish' subgroup that is the source of the banana fruit in the shops. Members of the 'Cavendish' subgroup vary in plant height and certain other characters but the quality of the fruit is essentially the same in each case. 'Grand Nain' is of medium height within the 'Cavendish' subgroup and is a useful commercial cultivar. (011) Sometimes referred to as musa nana. (013a) Outstanding variety, same as the "Chiquita" brand from Central America. Attractive for landscape, good wind resistance. (030) [A]n outstanding banana variety growing from 6 to 8 feet tall and solid green in color. Very attractive for its landscaping potential and good wind resistance. The 'Gran Nain' produces very large heads of delicious fruit. (032) This is the commercial variety that you buy in the grocery store. The purchased ones are good but if you grow this one yourself you'll see how wonderful these can taste. These full sized fruits ripen rapidly and they can give 40-60 pounds of fruit with ease. (037) Fair tolerance to cold. (052) [C]ommercial variety most often found in stores. It was derived from Dwarf Cavendish, and is grown on huge plantations in Central America. It is reportedly higher yielding, producing up to 150 lbs. of high quality fruit in the tropics. It also resists blossom end rot that can occur on Dwarf Cavendish. [S]usceptible to Black Sigatoka, reducing its productivity in Florida and requiring aerial fungicide sprays on commercial plantations. (056) In general, the Cavendish group is resistant to Panama disease, but is susceptible to Sigatoka. The characteristic that distinguishes the best known clones is the height of the pseudostem. The tallest clone is 'Lacatan' followed by 'Robusta' and 'Giant Cavendish,' 'Grand Nain,' and 'Dwarf Cavendish.' 'Valery,' a common type in Central America, is considered the same as 'Robusta' by some taxonomists. (028)

TYPE: DESSERT
GENETICS: AAA Cavendish group (011) ( (025) (028) (038) (064)
HEIGHT: 5-7' (056), 6-8' (011) (061) (007) (032) (037), 6-10' (009)
DISEASE: Panama wilt resistant.
HIGHLIGHTS: Commercial Variety, sold as Chiquita.

(005) (038) (010) (022) (036) (911) (101) (101) (101) (101) (101) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (032) (037) (061)



GRAND NAIN-X-SUMATRANA Cross
CROSS, X

DESCRIPTION:
[A]s we call it the "X" is a cross between the popular dessert banana and the ornamental red leaf plant. The fruit is very small making it more of an ornamental than eating variety, however the leaves are much wider than its progenitor creating a gorgeous landscape addition. (011) (010)

TYPE: ORNAMENTAL, FRESH (?)
GENETICS:
HEIGHT:
HIGHLIGHTS:

(910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910)

CHOKING

(910) (910) (910) (910) (910)



GRANDA

DESCRIPTION:
Other varieties grown in the [Philippines] include the Morado, Pitogo, Los Banos, Senorita, Tindok, Gloria, Granda, and Tumok. (066)


TYPE:
GENETICS:
HEIGHT:





GREAT DANE
DESCRIPTION:
This is my name for a plant I purchased as Gran Nain and which turned out to be a tall plant with a possibly Namwah looking fruit. Early 2005 should bring the taste test. (910)

TYPE:
GENETICS:
HEIGHT:
HIGHLIGHTS:

(910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910)



GREEN AE AE

DESCRIPTION:
A beautiful banana plant with wide leaves, similar to Popoulo (063)

TYPE:
GENETICS:
HEIGHT:
HIGHLIGHTS:





GREEN KRU

DESCRIPTION:
The Green Kru is the same flavored fruit [as Kru] with out the wine colored markings. (011)

TYPE:
GENETICS:
HEIGHT:
HIGHLIGHTS:





GREEN RED
Kru (009), Pisang Gambu , Tall Green Red (032)

DESCRIPTION:
Strong vigorous plant produces medium bunches of bananas which are a brilliant red and gold on ripening with aromatic cream colored pulp. If the Jamaican Red is the Queen of bananas this variety is King. One of the most beautiful banana fruits in this world. Time to bear 20-30 months, 1 year cycle thereafter. (007) Mutation of Red banana with greener foliage, and fruits that yellow upon ripening. Untried in California. (009) This is the king of banana plants, produces med bunches of brilliant red and gold on ripening with aromatic cream colored pulp. (063) Sometimes the red will mutate from red to all green. Then it is called the "Tall Green Red". (032) [T]he plant is variegated green and red ... with pseudostem to 18 in thick at the base. The bunch bears 4 to 7 hands, the fruits are thick, 5 to 7 in long. The purplish-red peel changes to orange-yellow and the flesh is firm, cream-colored and of good quality. (076) In the mutant [of Red] called 'Green Red', the plant is variegated green and red with pseudostem to 18 in. thick at the base. (076)

TYPE:
GENETICS: AAA (009) (025)
HEIGHT: 16-18' (032), 20-25' (007), 28' (076)
HIGHLIGHTS:

(910) (910)



GREEN TAPO
"Green Tapo" (reverted 'Tapo')

DESCRIPTION:

TYPE:
GENETICS: AA (064)
HEIGHT:
HIGHLIGHTS:





GRINDY
SEE Pisang Raja



GROS MICHEL
Bluefileds, Pisang Ambon, Guineo gigante, Banano, Plantano roatan (028) , Kluai Hom Thong (025) , Pisang Ambon (025)

DESCRIPTION:
Once the only commercial variety seen on grocery shelves now replaced by Grand Nain due to its sensitivity to fusarium wilt. Although it has a superb flavor, it is not promoted as it once was.
(011) (010) The standard cultivar for the banana industry for 70 years, Its fruits are very large and of outstanding quality. Furthermore, because of the symmetry of the bunches and upward curve of the individual fingers the entire stalk could be transported directly to distant markets. Because of its susceptibility to Panama disease, Gros Michel's dominance of the banana industry has been eclipsed by the Cavendish cultivars. The plant [is] somewhat slender in stature requiring propping and sensitive to cold. At present it is not known whether it has been successfully fruited in California. In Florida, however, it is considered marginal. (009) [D]oes not produce well in Florida. It has poor cold tolerance and is susceptible to Panama disease. It is not recommended for planting in the home landscape or commercially. (028) Formerly the most widely cultivated banana in the western hemisphere, it has now been phased out due to susceptibility to Panama disease (Fusarium wilt). It has produced several clones and has been used as the parent for newer cultivars. Male sterile. (098) Fusarium wilt is a serious problem on many banana cultivars. Widely grown clones in the AAA 'Gros Michel' subgroups are also susceptible. (130) [T]here is the group represented by the prominent and widely cultivated 'Gros Michel' originally from Burma, Thailand, Malaya, Indonesia and Ceylon. It was introduced into Martinique early in the 19th Century by a French naval officer and, a few years later, was taken to Jamaica; from there it was carried to Fiji, Nicaragua, Hawaii and Australia, in that sequence. It is a large, tall plant bearing long bunches of large, yellow fruits, and it was formerly the leading commercial cultivar in Central Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, but has been phased out because of its great susceptibility to Panama disease. It has given rise to several named sports or mutants. (076) Gros Michel was the basis of the early export banana trade in the Latin America/Caribbean region and it was the progressive decline of plantations of this cultivar due to Fusarium wilt in the 1940-50s that led to the adoption of cultivars in the AAA 'Cavendish' Subgroup as the main export banana types. (???) [A] mutation that produces a fruit bunch that divides into two as it grows ... has occurred in three different banana types in 'Dwarf Cavendish and 'Gross Michel' in the AAA group and in 'Maia Maiole' in the AAB group. (011) During the '60s and '70s when you went to the grocery store you bought a banana called a Gros Michel. They were a little larger and MUCH better tasting than the bananas that are available in the stores today. However, the banana plant that produces the Gros Michel is very susceptible to Panama Wilt which devastated the banana plantations back then. We therefore can only buy the Gran Nain variety in the store, which is much more disease tolerant. (079) Gros Michel has lower susceptibility to BBTV, with delayed symptom expression and less severe symptoms. (116) hom = fragrant (Thai)

TYPE: DESSERT
GENETICS: AAA (028) (025) (098)
HEIGHT: 12-14' (011) (002)
DISEASE: Fusarim susceptible.
HIGHLIGHTS:

(105)



HA'A

DESCRIPTION:
[M]ember of the Hilahila sub group of Polynesian cooking bananas [which includes] the White Iholena & Red Iholena. The Ha'a is the shortest of the group and produces fruit that are yellowish from the onset, making it difficult to determine when to harvest. (Do not use color as the only indicator to pick your fruit). All are excellent for a multitude of uses. (004)

TYPE: DESSERT, COOKING
GENETICS:
HEIGHT: 6-8' (004)
HIGHLIGHTS:





HAA HAA
Iholena Ula'Ula' (009), Dwarf White Iholena (097)

DESCRIPTION:
A striking plant which bears medium bunches of delicious fruit with orange flesh. A rare form of the Iholena Family. (061) (007) The plant is very stout and vigorous in appearance with an unusual ivory hue to the trunk and petioles. (007) A dwarf form of White lholena, very stout, with fruit similar to the others. Average hardiness. (009) Fruit turns yellow long before ripe. Tends to fall over with fruit on it, so definitely needs bracing. (097) This is a dwarf stout plant with a yellow skin and orange flesh. (063) Striking plant producing medium bunches of delicious fruit. (096)

TYPE: DESSERT
GENETICS: AAA (009)
HEIGHT: 6' (910), 6-8' (009), 10-12' (061) (007)
HIGHLIGHTS: Color change.

(910) (910) (910) (005) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (061)



HAJARE

DESCRIPTION:

TYPE:
GENETICS: ABB (006)
HEIGHT:
HIGHLIGHTS:





HAMAKUA

DESCRIPTION:
A Cavendish [variety]. {EDIT} Hamakua bananas, which are medium to large in size. Their skins are light green or light yellow even when they are ripe. (143)HREF="http://www.extento.hawaii.edu/kbase/crop/crops/i_banana.htm" TARGET="NEW">(024)

TYPE:
GENETICS:
HEIGHT:
HIGHLIGHTS:





HAPAI

DESCRIPTION:
There were over 70 varieties of native mai`a, such as the manini, mahoe, hapai, kahiki, ele ele, etc. In the old days there were 70 cultivated varieties of bananas that expert Hawaiian farmers nurtured and crossbred. (113) Mai'a Popoulu (breadfruit-like ball shaped banana.) (108) {EDIT} One variety of Hawaiian banana was the hapai (pregnant) banana. The bananas mature two-thirds of the way up and inside the banana trunk. Ripeness is detected by swarming fruit flies or ants. One variety, the iholena bears bronzy leaf undersides and the fruit, which has apricot-colored flesh is best when cooked. It was one of the varieties women were allowed to eat. (143)

TYPE:
GENETICS:
HEIGHT:
HIGHLIGHTS:





HAWAIIAN Varieties

DESCRIPTION:
Cavendish and Brazilians are the two major groups of dessert bananas in Hawaii. The Cavendish group includes 'Williams', 'Valery', 'Hamakua', 'Grand Nain', and 'Chinese' varieties. The Brazilian bananas are often incorrectly referred to as apple bananas in Hawaii. This group includes the 'Dwarf Brazilian'. The Bluefields group, which includes 'Bluefields' and 'Dwarf Bluefields', was the leading commercial variety in Hawaii. Currently, this group accounts for less than 1% of banana production in Hawaii due to its susceptibility to the Panama wilt disease. Starchy cooking bananas, or plantains, are also found in Hawaii. Largo, Maia maole, and Popoulu are various plantain groups. (024) In the old days there were 70 cultivated varieties of bananas that expert Hawaiian farmers nurtured and crossbred. The one... called mai'a popo'ulu (literally, breadfruit ball-like banana) and had pink flesh; it is used mainly in cooking. Sadly, these Hawaiian-type cultivars are very susceptible to bunchy top. But they were already disappearing before someone carelessly smuggled bananas into Hawai'i and imported this devastating disease at the same time. The old varieties do better at higher elevations, and you used to find them more along mauka trails and near old house sites. The nice collection once found at Ho'omaluhia Botanic Garden succumbed to bunchy top. Waimea Arboretum had the last, best collection on O'ahu. But when I inspected the collection last week, it was in perilously sad shape; little horticultural care is being given to the plant collection. Things look dry, weedy, unmulched and unnurtured. (113) Hawaiians enjoyed eating the different varieties of mai'a. There were different varieties, some were eaten raw and some were cooked. All the varieties were kapu (forbidden) to woman except for three types. These types were mai'a hapai (pregnant banana), mai'a popo ulu (breadfruit-like ball shaped banana) and mai'a mahoe (twin banana). Clumps of banana were planted near the hale (homes) and the taro loi. (107) Mai`a usually grows in moist areas that are wind protected or planted around dwellings or on well-watered banks of taro lo`i. It can grow on median forest belts from an altitude of 1500 to 3000 ft. and on lower fringes of the forests. There were over 70 varieties of native mai`a, such as the manini, mahoe, hapai, kahiki, ele ele, etc. During Liholiho's time, some kinds of banana were kapu to women, death being the penalty for disobedience. There are lots of Hawaiian myth associated with banana. The Hawaiian literature is rich in the use of similes referring to bananas: "his skin was like a ripe banana" or "his beauty returned like the beauty of a young banana leaf". According to a Hawaiian legend: Pele, the goddess of volcanoes, brought the banana to Hawaii, where it was believed that it's bad luck to dream of bananas or to meet a person carrying them and to carry bananas as part of a lunch on a fishing trip. A banana stalk was used in lieu of a human sacrifice. Banana has many worldwide uses: leaves for house roofs, umbrellas, plates, cattle feed, cigarette papers, clothing and packing materials; leaf buds for vegetables; leaf sheaths for water runways and in Hawaii as containers for leis or plants to be transported. The leaf sheaths were used for thatching, for stringing leis, dor tying, for plaiting into clothing and for cloth and thread. In the Philippines, the flowers are cooked and eaten as vegetables. The flowers, fruit and roots are used medicinally in some parts of the world. In India the ashes are used for dyeing, tanning, in curries and substitute for salt. From the fruit: alcohol, vinegar and wine can be produced. (108)

ELE ELE - (108)

HAPAI - Mai'a Hapai (pregnant banana). (108)

KAHIKI - (108)

MANAIULA - An excellent Hawaiian cooking banana. Quite vigorous, produces medium bunches of orange fleshed fruit. Red coloration in new growth and suckers. Underside of leaf and midrib washed in pink. An attractive plant. 18-20' (063)

MANINI - (108)

MAHOE - Mai'a Mahoe (twin banana). (108)

POPOULU - Mai'a Popoulu (breadfruit-like ball shaped banana.) (108)

Mai`a =Hawaiian for banana.



HAWAIIAN BLACK
SEE Ele Ele



HIGH COLOR MINI

DESCRIPTION:
Dwarf Cavendish variety. Dessert, excellent fruit. (032)

TYPE: DESSERT
GENETICS:
HEIGHT: 8-10' (032)
HIGHLIGHTS:

(148) (149) (149)



HIGHGATE
See COCOS

DESCRIPTION:
The Kannara Centre maintains 212 accessions of banana. Two banana hybrids - H1 and H2 were recommended for cultivation in Kerala. Five superior types from the germ plasm - Dudhsagar, Sugandhi, Mysore Ethan and Highgate were selected based on yield. (114) Bhagwat, B. and Duncan, E. J. (1997) Mutation breeding of banana cv Highgate (Musa spp., AAA Group) for tolerance to Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense using chemical mutagens. Scientia Horticulturae Vol. 73 , 11 -22 (1998) Mutation breeding of Highgate (Musa acuminata, AAA) for tolerance to Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense using gamma irradiation. Euphytica 101 143 - 150. (115) Andrew Geering described the presence of partial resistance to Banana bunchy top virus (BBTU) in various banana genotypes. For example, Gros Michel has lower susceptibility to BBTV, with delayed symptom expression and less severe symptoms. Highgate, a member of the Gros Michel subgroup of bananas, is used for breeding by the FHIA (Fundación Hondureña de Investigacion Agrícola) program, and could potentially be a source of partial resistance to BBTV. He pointed out that new hybrids being generated by the breeding programs are not routinely screened under conditions of high BBTV inoculum pressure, and therefore potential partial resistance to BBTV could be being missed. He recommended a programme of screening for resistance to be implemented (in the same way as screening e.g.for resistance to Sigatoka diseases or Fusarium). The group agreed that this type of screening should be done in the field with infector rows to ensure uniform infection. (116) A great amount of clones of cambures exists and bananas of commercial importance, product of somatic mutations, so is the case of the mentioned ones by CHEESMAN (3) and SIMMONDS (10), talking about to the sub-group 'Cavendish', in where they exist from types extra-dwarves to giants. A dwarfed form is also known the 'Gros Michel', denominated 'Cocos' in America Center. The reversion of this mutant towards its original form has been studied by RICHARDSON (7). LANGHE (6) mentions the existence of 56 types different from bananas in Equatorial Africa. Many of these mutations happened towards dwarfed types, have been taken advantage of by their agronómico value, so it is the case of the 'Dwarf Cavendish' and the 'Cocos' ('Highgate'). (117)

TYPE:
GENETICS: AAA (115)
HEIGHT:
HIGHLIGHTS:





HILAHILA GROUP
SEE Iholena Group

DESCRIPTION:
Red Iholena ... is not only beautiful, with the underside of the leaves being a soft burgundy color, but also used for eating out of hand, dehydrating and cooking. The others in the Hilahila sub group of Polynesian cooking bananas include the White Iholena & Ha'a. The Ha'a is the shortest of the group and produces fruit that are yellowish from the onset, making it difficult to determine when to harvest. (Do not use color as the only indicator to pick your fruit). The White is devoid of the burgundy coloration but produces a similar fruit. All are excellent for a multitude of uses. (011) (004) (010) [Red Iholena] is a close relative of Musa White Iholene and Musa Ha'a, which is the dwarf form of the Iholene group. Very distinctive. (032)




HONEY
Sucrier (009), Nino (009), Pisang Mas (058)

DESCRIPTION:
One of the world's most popular local bananas that has remained outside the international marketplace because of low productivity and poor shipping qualities. It is very sweet, with tiny hands of petite fruit born on a fragile slender plant. Best grown in part shade or morning sun. (009) [A]s it's name suggests, is a very sweet banana; it has small fruit, thin skin, yellowy flesh, and small bunches (up to 28 lbs). Planting to harvest is about 11 months under subtropical conditions. Unfortunately, this cultivar is not well adapted to cooler temperatures. Not recommended. (058)

TYPE: DESSERT
GENETICS: AA (009)
HEIGHT: 6-8' (009), 8-11' (058)
HIGHLIGHTS:





HORN PLANTAIN
Kluai Nga Chang

DESCRIPTION:


TYPE:
GENETICS:
HEIGHT:
HIGHLIGHTS:





HUA MOA
Hawaiiano (056)

DESCRIPTION
A Polynesian cooking banana that is short and stubby but packed with flavor. These make wonderful tostones and maduros as well as other banana recipes. The large full leaves and fat, rounded fruit make this a great looking plant. (011) (004) (010) A beautiful Hawaiian variety with average bunches of short plump fruit to 4" in diameter. Fruit may be eaten fresh or cooked. Likes filtered sun with ample moisture. World's best cooking banana. (061) [A] Hawaiian variety which produces small bunches of very plump roundish fruit which may be eaten fresh or cooked and have a delicious flavor. Likes protected locations in filtered light with ample moisture. World's best cooking banana. (007) One of the finest cooking bananas, it is also very palatable eaten raw. In contrast to the Popoulu it bears far fewer fruits, but they are considerably larger. The plant is very slender and elegant with long narrow leaves. Tender. (009) Hua Moa is actually a plantain. The plant has very unusually fat fruit. The fruit can grow to 3 inches in diameter and 10 inches long. The plant was introduced to the United States from Tahiti by William F. Whitman in 1960. It has since been distributed around South Florida by W.O. Lessard and is very popular with the Cuban community. The fruit is commonly fried as a plantain, yet it also very good eaten fresh when it ripens. It is better to pick the fruit prior to it turning yellow, as the fruit often splits. (027) (041) [A] leading cultivar in south Florida despite its susceptibility to Panama disease and poor cold tolerance. The fruit can be eaten fresh or cooked and is reported to make excellent fried green and smashed bananas. [R]equires intensive care and is recommended only for planting with disease-free material in warm, protected sites free of Panama disease. (028) A Hawaiian variety which produces small bunches of plump roundish fruit which may be eaten fresh or cooked (063) [A] sturdy plant with thick trunk. It is of solid green color and medium wide leaves. The fruit are very fat, growing to 3 inches or more in diameter and 10 to11 inches long The texture has no fiber at all and the effect when fried is just delicious. The plant is somewhat cold sensitive and can be injured by temperatures below 40°F. (032) (040) [A] banana-plantain cross that is produced commercially on the E. Coast of Florida. The 'melon-shaped' fruits are 6 to 11 in. long and 3 in. or more in diameter. The orange flesh is good for eating fresh and highly esteemed in Cuba as a cooking banana for making tostones. Remove the stalk before it ripens or the fruit will split as it yellows. (056) [T]the bananas are short and plump, very thin skinned, inclined to split and to tear off and fall when it is very ripe, very white fleshed, dense, sweet, without flouriness or sliminess, but astringent when it isn't fully ripe. It is highly suceptible to Panama disease. It bears fairly reliably in warm temperate areas, and in spite of splitting, it's superior flavor and reliable productivity makes it a recommendation. (058) It is an excellent cooking banana. The bunches are smaller than most varieties, but the odd individuals fruits are up to 4 inches in diameter. (038) Plump round fruit. World's best cooking banana. (096)

TYPE: PLANTAIN, COOKING, FRESH
GENETICS: AAA (038) AAB (006) (009) (028)
HEIGHT:
HIGHLIGHTS: Best cooking banana. Large diameter. Orange color. Good for Tostones.
PROBLEMS: Splitting.

(910) (910) (005) (038) (022) (010) (039) (911) (911) (911) (101) (101) (101) (101) (105) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910) (910)



ICE CREAM
Blue Java, Ney Mannan (006), Javanese cooking banana (025) , Hawaiian banana (025) , Cenizo (Sp.), Ducasse (Aust.)(025) , Cenizo (076), Krie (076)

DESCRIPTION:
A very beautiful, cool tolerant plant that produces a blue/green fruit with pure white flesh. The sweet creamy fruit is very delightful. (011) (013a) With texture and flavor similar to vanilla ice cream. Beatuiful large leaves and produces medium bunches of silvery blue bananas that are very delicious fresh or cooked. (002) (005) An extremely vigorous and healthy banana which bears a medium bunch of delicious bananas that are a distinct silvery blue before ripening. Bananas are delicious fresh or cooked. (007) A mutation of Orinoco (or possibly Saba), with attractive silver/blue skin. The fruit is quite pudding-like and can be eaten with a spoon, but suffers from the same spongy core. (009) Unique fruit that tastes like custard and the appearance of ice cream. Fruits are of a silvery blue and matures to a pale canary yellow. (031) In spite of its height, it stands up to the wind well having a strong stem and root system. The leaves are a silver-green color. And the fruit is blue-green. The fruit is medium sized and the flesh is snow white. The quality of the fruit is excellent, many rate this is the best tasting banana. (032) This banana tastes like vanilla custard. The skin is silvery blue before ripening, and turns a light creamy yellow when ripe. One of the very best tasting varieties. (037) The fruit is medium length, wedge shaped and bluish green until ripe, then it turns yellow. The flesh is snow white and sweet. Susceptible to disease, therefore Nam Weh may be a better choice. (056) Bluish-green coloration on the undersides of leaves. Fruit is silvery-blue before ripening then turns a pale yellow. Delicious banana that can be eaten fresh or cooked. (048) Ice Cream banana of Hawaii, 'Cenizo' of Central America and the West Indies, 'Krie' of the Philippines, is a relative of 'Bluggoe'. The leaf midrib is light pink, the flower stalk may be several feet long, but the bunch has only 7 to 9 hands. The fruit is 7 to 9 in long, up to 2 1/2 in thick, 4-to 5-angled, bluish with a silvery bloom when young, pale yellow when ripe, The flesh is white, sweetish, and is eaten raw or cooked. (076) Tastes like ice cream. They say you can even eat it with a spoon. May be a sport of Saba or Orinoco. Choke resistant, but reports are it is more sensitive to cold soil than 'Goldfinger' or 'Orinoco.' Silvery blue green fruit have pure white interiors. Some say this one tastes the best, one source says it can sometimes get a spongy core. People who have tasted it rave about it. It produces very heavily. (079) Plant has a blue green color under the leaves and a blueish green fruit. Bananas are delicious fresh or cooked. (063) With texture and flavor similar to vanilla ice cream. Beatuiful large leaves and produces medium bunches of silvery blue bananas that are very delicious fresh or cooked. (010) Blue-green plump fruit with a white melting flesh. (096) This banana tastes like vanilla ice cream and has the consistency of a custard, unlike the firm bananas we purchase in the grocery store. The plant has bluish gray leaves and fruits. The fruits turn a light yellow when ripe. (039) Has a pithy core. Some people dislike this variety. Others like it a lot. (097) 6" long powder blue fruit with excellent soft, sweet, flesh in bunches to 50 lbs. Very good tolerance to cold. (052) An extremely vigorous and healthy banana that bears a medium bunch of delicious bananas that are a silvery blue before ripening. Bananas are delicious fresh or cooked. (047) [S]o called because the bunches of immature fruit are covered in a waxy bloom which gives them a blue-green caste. The fruit has particularly long stalks, are slightly angular, and have white flesh. Suceptible to Panama disease. Fruits poorly in warm temperate areas, not recommended. (058) {EDIT} Ice Cream bananas, which are small and stubby with light-yellow skins that crack easily. Their flesh is white, tender and sweet. (143)

TYPE: DESSERT ((022)
GENETICS: ABB (006)(022) (028) (079)
HEIGHT: 11' (910), 13' (058), 15' (022) (032) (038) (097), 15-20' (047) (010), 16' (039) (076), 18' (052)
DISEASE: Black sigatoka resistant (126)
HIGHLIGHTS: Silver-blue color.

(910) (910) (002) (010) (039) (105) (005) (038) (022)

(038) (022) (010) (022) (905) (101) (101) (150)

(150) (150) (150) (075) (075) (910) (032) (061) (074) (074)



IGCPOCA

DESCRIPTION:
One of our newer bananas that gives a plump, sweet delicious light green fruit with a pointed end. A thumbs up in every way. (Pronounce it if you can.) (011) (010)

TYPE: DESSERT
GENETICS:
HEIGHT: 10-12' (011) (010)
HIGHLIGHTS:





IGITISIRI

DESCRIPTION:

TYPE:
GENETICS: AAA (006)
HEIGHT:
HIGHLIGHTS:





IHOLENA GROUP
HilaHila Group font>(036)

DESCRIPTION:
Musa 'White Iholena', Musa 'Iholena ula'ula', Musa 'Red Iholena'

HAA HAA - (Iholena Ula'Ula') - A dwarf form of White lholena, 6-8', very stout, with fruit similar to the others. Average hardiness. (009)

KOFI - (010) From Papau New Guinea, a member of the Iholena sub group which is a combination cooking-dessert banana that rated highest in the TREC (University of Florida / Tropical Research and Education Center) tasting tests. (004)

KUMMUNABA - Sets 7-8 hands of bananas. It is a robust variety with erect leaves. The bananas have yellow/orange flesh. [A] good suckerer, and the flower is cream colored with an orange tip. It has a low susceptibility to yellow Sigatoka. (032) New AAB cultivar in the Iholena subgroup. This new dessert bananas produces good size fruits. (038)

RED IHOLENA - A stunning mutation of the above with a combination of pinks and purples in the psuedostems and leaves otherwise identical. (009)

WHITE IHOLENA - The fastest growing banana from planting to harvest, (less than one year). The fruit has a distinctive pink flesh. Maximum height tends to be between 8-15'. The skin of the fruit turns yellow long before they are ready to harvest, and should be left on the bunch until they are soft. Average hardiness, requires propping. (009)





IHOLENA ULA'ULA'
Haa Haa (009)

DESCRIPTION:


TYPE: DESSERT
GENETICS: AAA (Iholena group) (006)
HEIGHT:
HIGHLIGHTS:





INARNIBAL
Arnibal (?)

DESCRIPTION:


TYPE:
GENETICS:
HEIGHT:
HIGHLIGHTS:

(051)



INDIAN GROUP

DESCRIPTION:

MYSORE (Palaynkoden). Represents 70 % of the bananas produced in India. The fruit is of the highest quality, sweet with a good texture. The plant is vigorous, semi-hardy with large bunches of small fruit. Its leaves and trunk are ornamental, with splashes of red, black, and purple. 8-15'. (009) This is very common variety grown in Kerala. Generally the fruits are very cheap and available in a bulk quantities in all vegetable markets throughout a year. This is cultivated in the Coconut and Arecanut plantations as mixed crop. The bunch of fruits is weighing average 20 to 25 kgs with more than 200 fruits. the fruits are small sized, about 10 cm long and 10.5 girth. The people use these fruits for dual purpose, mainly as a dessert and for cooking (with Beef or Pork). (050)

NENDRAN (Ethakai). The fruits are big sized, used for dual purpose as dessert and for cooking. These are eaten raw after ripening and also used for the preparation of different types of Kerala dishes. Each bunch of fruit has minimum of 5 clusters (hands) weighing about 25-55 lbs. The harvest of this variety is connected to Onam (a harvest festival in the month of August or September). The fruits are also best for the preparation of Banana Chips. (050)

PYSANG RAJA - Has unusual, orange-fleshed fruit. The plant is vigorous, producing many large flavorful fruit. Semi-hardy. (009)

KAPPA PAZHAM (Cheng Kathali) This is a red couloured variety, mostly cultivated in southern region of Kerala, especially in the higher elevations. The fruits and Pseudostem are also red in colour. The fruits are medium sized, 4-1/2" long and 4" in girth . Generally, each bunch has 8-10 hands weighing 25-55 lbs. (050)

KARPURAVALLI - This is as a special variety, shade loving, cultivated in the Coconut and Arecanut plantations as mixed crop. The fruits are medium sized with grayish in colour. Each bunch has 7-9 hands, weighing about 20-45 lbs. (050)

KATHALI. This is very tasty fruit, small sized , generally used as dessert and as an offering to Gods in Hindu Temples. Normally one bunch of fruits with 5-8 clusters, maximum of 85 fruits, weighing 18-20 lbs. (050)

KUNNAN This is also very common variety grown in Kerala. The fruits are used as Dessert and for making powder for infants as supplementary food. Each bunch of fruit has 7-9 hands weighing 11-17 lbs.

POOVAN. This is one of the best and delicious variety cultivated extensively almost all the regions of Kerala. Each bunch of fruit has 9-12 hands with average of 100-150 fruits. (050)

WALHA - [Has] a very stout pseudostem. This durable plant delivers small hands of petite fruit that are slightly crunchy. Semi-hardy. Will produce well in the shade. 6-8'

RAJA PURl - Another dwarf, semi-hardy, producing short, good-quality fruits. 6-8' (050)


Cultivated varieties are broadly divided into two groups: [Fresh and Culinary or Cooking]

FRESH: 'Poovan' in Madras (also known as 'Karpura Chakkarekeli' in Andhra Pradesh); 'Mortaman', 'Champa' and 'Amrit Sagar' in West Bengal; 'Basrai', 'Safed Velchi', 'Lal Velchi' and 'Rajeli' in Maharashtra; 'Champa' and 'Mortaman' in Assam and Orissa; and 'Rastali', 'Sirumalai', 'Chakkarekeli', 'Ney Poovan', 'Kadali' and 'Pacha Nadan' in southern India. 'Basrai', which is known under different names, viz. 'Mauritius', 'Vamankeli', 'Cavendish', 'Governor', 'Harichal', is also grown in central and southern India. Recently, the 'Robusta' variety is gaining popularity in Tamil Nadu and Karnataka. The 'Virupakshi' variety (Hill banana) is the most predominant variety in the Palni Hills of Tamil Nadu.

CULINARY: 'Nendran', 'Monthan', 'Myndoli' and 'Pacha Montha Bathis' are the leading commercial varieties in southern India. 'Gros Michel' is a recent introduction into southern India. [I]t is suitable for cultivation only under garden-land conditions and is generally fastidious in its cultural requirements. It is not, therefore, in favour with the [commercial growers]. (074)

There are several varieties of banana grown in [Kerala, India] such as Nendran, Nyali Poovan, Poovan (Silk), Palayankodan, Red banana, Monthan, Elaivazhai and Kunnan. (119)



ITERANS

DESCRIPTION:
This is the tallest, yet most elegant of the rare banana species of Yunnan [China]. It grows inside tropical mountain forests in the shade of trees and direct sunlight damages its dark green foliage. The trunks seem powdered white while the whole plant gives a dark purple impression. The Yunnan banana can reach 38' if planted under the shade of trees and fertilized well. This is one of the hardiest species for cold winters and even the leafs can tolerate frost. The seeds are mature in summer and are distributed by birds, bats, and even elephants. It is reported that the elephants of Xishuangbanna's nature reserves like to eat this banana species and this way are contributing to its distribution. (032)

TYPE: SEEDED
GENETICS:
HEIGHT: 38' (032)
HIGHLIGHTS:

(105) (065)





.
HOME
A-B
C-D
E-F
G-I
J-L
M-N
O-Q
R-S
T-Z

.


E-MAIL